The Correlation of Probable Cause to DUI Charges

One of the most common kinds of criminal charges is a DUI which stands for driving under the influence. However, just because it is common doesn’t mean that the process is always fair.

The scene is pretty easy to imagine. You could be driving through a stretch of road and then, suddenly, you see the lights from the rear view mirror and you’re getting asked to pull over. Suddenly, the police officer in question asks for you to do a sobriety test and there is alcohol found in your system.

You could then be charged with DUI and for something like this to be on your record could be catastrophic for potentials either professionally or educationally. In some situations, any criminal record can even affect you socially as there are some people who are denied the ability to adopt a child or rent an apartment somewhere if there is something on the record.

However, for as common as something like this charge can be, it isn’t always lawful. According to samples of claims and cases that are in the website of Truslow & Truslow, Attorneys at law, probable cause is necessary to be legally suspected. Sometimes, it is prejudice – racial or with regard to gender – that some people are unlawfully pulled over and suspected of DUI, just because it is one of the most common charges.

There are ways to combat a charge like this and erase it from your record when the charge in question was unwarranted in the first place. Has the officer who apprehended you shown signs of prejudice? Were the breathalyzers or other paraphernalia regularly checked and maintained? Was the blood alcohol level beyond the legal limit? And, one of the most important questions to ask, was there reason to suspect you of driving under the influence—otherwise known as probable cause?

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